What are New York City’s best apartment buildings? Before 1900, it was the Dakota and the Osborne; soon after came McKim, Mead & White’s magnificent Fifth Avenue buildings, followed by the true luxury edifices of the roaring ’20s and the Art Deco era. Today, the city’s skyline sparkles with palatial new buildings, such as Robert A. M. Stern’s 15 Central Park West, Richard Meier’s glass-walled Perry Street towers, and 432 Park Avenue, New York’s tallest residential building. Kirk Henckels and Anne Walker, real estate and architectural insiders, chronicle the fortunes and features of 15 outstanding apartment houses with a wealth of vintage and new photography and architectural plans, and show off select apartments as they look today, designed by top interior designers.

Kirk Henckels, is Vice Chairman of Stribling Residential Brokerage and the founding Director of Stribling Private Brokerage. He holds an economics degree from Stanford University and an MBA from Harvard Business School. He is the former President of Edward Lee Cave, Inc., and has been at Stribling since 1995, where he leads Stribling’s $5,000,000 and up luxury real estate brokerage division.

Anne Walker is an architectural historian at NYU and holds a Master’s Degree in Historic Preservation from Columbia University. She has collaborated with NYC architect Peter Pennoyer on several books on the history of twentieth-century American architecture, including The Architecture of Warren & Wetmore, The Architecture of Grosvenor Atterbury, and, most recently, Harrie T. Lindeberg and the American Country House. She is the author of Peter Pennoyer Architects: Apartments, Townhouses and Country Houses, and co-author of The Finest Rooms in America with Thomas Jayne, and A House in the Country with Pennoyer and Katie Ridder.

August 7th from 6-8pm at Rosecliff.

Reception immediately following the lecture. Advance ticket purchase is required. 

Preservation Society Members $15 / General Public $20
www.NewportMansions.org/Learn/Adult-Programs, or call 401-847-1000 ext. 178

Comments

comments